Teaching Directionals with Amanda – Teaching “Here”

In this video I am discussing how I teach my “Here” command.

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Teaching Directionals around a Barrel – by Amanda Nelson

Hi Everyone!

In this article, I am going to talk about how and why I teach specific directional commands for the barrel.

I teach my dogs a Turn and an Away command for the barrel, Turn means for my dog to turn towards me around the barrel and Away means for my dog to turn away from me around the barrel.

I want my dogs to learn independent barrel performances, this way I do not need to be right next to the barrel to give them a direction.  My goal for my dogs at the end of their directional training with the barrel is that I can say “Go Turn” and they will drive to the barrel and turn around it. This way I can incorporate bigger distances with the barrel.

In the video below you will see me working Ally on her beginning directionals around the barrel, I start very close and show them the path around the barrel, sometimes I will lure if necessary.

I will continue to add more distance as I feel the dog is gaining confidence in the barrel performance and my cues.

This video shows myself starting Ally on her Turn and Away commands.

 

Pressure Points by Amanda Nelson

The game of dog agility is all about pressure, applying pressure to increase distance or to create a turn, or relieving pressure to bring the dog into to you.

In my TEAM Training system I talk a lot about pressure and how to teach your dog how to read the various kinds of pressure, in daily life and in agility.

When I apply pressure on the agility course I am increasing the distance between me and the dog or preparing for a turn away from me. Applying pressure means I would be moving towards my dog, whether that is 3 steps toward the dog or just 1 depending on the situation.

When I relieve pressure I am bringing the dog in towards me, directing them to the inside obstacle of a discrimination or bringing them in for a turn.

When I walk a course I look at all the pressure points of the course, where do I need to apply pressure to create an efficient turn? Where do I need to relieve pressure to bring the dog into a closer line?

By breaking the course up into pressure points it makes it easier for me to see my key handling positions, the best positions to apply or relieve the pressure.

I will be going deeper into this subject in later blog posts, but the diagram below shows some examples of various pressure points in a sequence.

Also below is a Youtube clip from my TEAM Training Overview series that talks a little bit about how to use Space Games to teach dogs to respond to pressure.

Pressure Points

Live with your dog – Jeannie Biggers

Live with your Dog

As I sat in the middle of my rock gardens in the unfenced front yard picking weeds the other day… I looked up and just watched my three dogs. I watched them roam around as they watched passer byers on foot, bicycle, horseback, and car.

It amazes me how they seem to “know” the property boundary. The feeling of pure joy and a great sense of being proud came over me. Those few hours the 4 of us spent that afternoon were priceless.

Agility really is such a small part of having “an agility” dog in your life. The amount of time we spend with these wonderful partners on an agility course really has no comparison to the time we spend with them in life.

I am the one that lives with my dogs 24 hours a day…not my instructor, not the person that wrote the article, not the seminar instructor etc. These people can only give suggestions on what things have worked for them with their dogs and how they “enjoy” living with their dogs.

Just because they may not agree with how you do something, train something, or how you live with your dog doesn’t always mean you are wrong.

It is wonderful that these people take the time to share their experiences but don’t let it get you down if one doesn’t agree with how IMG_1548you do something.

The journey that our dogs will take us on is incredible. Don’t stop learning from them or force them to be who they are not. Be inspired by and proud of where you have been and where you are going as a team.

Enjoy each and every moment you get to “live” with them.

Jeannie Biggers

E” is for Energy! by Sunny Williams

How much are you giving to your teamwork?

One exercise I like to do with my students is to have each team, handler and dog walk in a large circle, then briskly jog in the circle, and last but least come to a stop.

Have you ever noticed that the amount of energy you put into your lower body is the same for your dog?

Meaning if you simply are walking in a slow pace your dog will do the same, and if you start to put more energy in your lower body your dog will do so also.

Have you ever tried for tight turn when running full out? In most cases you will need to take some of the energy out of lower body in order to get that tight turn the same goes for when you need a good fast send out, put some “go” in your lower body.

So if you find yourself wanting more drive or motivation from your dog try putting more energy in your handling and the same theory would go for the team who maybe feels like things are out of control, try to use a more even pace.

I have found it can be a fun game to learn how your dog responds to the amount of energy you are giving or taking.

Have fun! Train happy!

Sunny Williams

Pressure Points by Amanda Nelson

The game of dog agility is all about pressure, applying pressure to increase distance or to create a turn, or relieving pressure to bring the dog into to you.

In my TEAM Training system I talk a lot about pressure and how to teach your dog how to read the various kinds of pressure, in daily life and in agility.

When I apply pressure on the agility course I am increasing the distance between me and the dog or preparing for a turn away from me. Applying pressure means I would be moving towards my dog, whether that is 3 steps toward the dog or just 1 depending on the situation.

When I relieve pressure I am bringing the dog in towards me, directing them to the inside obstacle of a discrimination or bringing them in for a turn.

When I walk a course I look at all the pressure points of the course, where do I need to apply pressure to create an efficient turn? Where do I need to relieve pressure to bring the dog into a closer line?

By breaking the course up into pressure points it makes it easier for me to see my key handling positions, the best positions to apply or relieve the pressure.

I will be going deeper into this subject in later blog posts, but the diagram below shows some examples of various pressure points in a sequence.

Also below is a Youtube clip from my TEAM Training Overview series that talks a little bit about how to use Space Games to teach dogs to respond to pressure.

Pressure Points
Pressure Points

From the Fluid Motion Blog at http://www.fmablog.com